Care Hero
Care Hero Make A Difference

Herefordshire

Speech and languagetherapy assistant Support worker Shared Lives Carer Personal Assistant Activity Support Worker Occupational Therapy Support Worker Physiotherapyassistant

Support worker

The role

A support worker works with people who require support with different needs including learning disabilities, mental health problems, physical disabilities and social problems. For more information on day-to-day duties see the National Careers Service website.

Also may be known as:

  • Care assistant
  • Care worker
  • Nursing home assistant

Average salary

£12,500 to £25,000 per year (National Careers Service)

Hours

full time (35 to 40 hours per week) and part time hours are available in this role. You may be asked to work shifts.

Entry requirements

 Some experience in a caring role is useful for a support worker but is not essential. You could have experience in a caring role from a variety of experiences including caring for a relative/friend or volunteering at an organisation providing care.

Training and qualification opportunities

 If you haven’t worked in adult social care before, you’ll work towards the Care Certificate as part of a 12-week induction programme. Click here for more information on the Care Certificate. You should also get the opportunity for further specialist training in relevant areas such as:

  • Autism
  • Dementia
  • Diabetes
  • Manual handling
  • Medication
  • Learning disability

Career progression

Experience as a Support Worker can enable progression to other specialist direct care roles such as:

  • Speech and language therapy assistant
  • Physiotherapy assistant
  • Activities worker
  • Personal assistant
  • Rehabilitation worker
  • Advocacy worker

You can also progress to a variety of management roles such as care coordinators and team leaders.

The information for this page has been adapted from the National Careers Service and Skills for Care. Both websites have a great amount of useful information if you are interested in learning more about becoming a Care Worker.

Speech and language therapy assistant

The role

A Speech and Language therapy assistant supports a speech and language therapist. They help people with speech, language and communication problems, or difficulties in swallowing, drinking or eating. For more information on day-to-day duties see the National Careers Service website or The Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

Average salary

£15,250 to £22,500 per year (National Careers Service)

Hours

full time (usually 37.5 hours per week) and part time hours are available in this role.

Entry requirements

Some experience in a caring role is useful for a Speech and Language Therapy Assistant but is not essential. There are no set entry requirements but some organisations may request:

  • 4 or 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C)
  • Previous voluntary or paid experience of working with the people relevant to your roles eg. Older people, children or people with physical disabilities.

Training and qualifications

There are opportunities as a Speech and Language Therapy Assistant to gain qualifications and undertake training programmes such as an S/NVQ qualification.

Career progression

Experience as a Speech and Language Therapy Assistant can lead to managerial positions such as a team leader supervising other Speech and Language Therapy Assistants.

Experience working as a Speech and Language Therapist Assistant can be valuable when applying for a degree qualification to train as a Speech and Language Therapist. It demonstrates relevant experience and commitment although will not directly count towards the qualification. Find out about degrees in Speech and Language therapy here.

The information for this page has been adapted from the National Careers Service website, for more information, you can visit their page on Speech and Language Therapy Assistants here. Information has also been used from the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists.

Physiotherapy assistant

The role:

Physiotherapy assistants work with people of all ages who have an injury, disability or illness/disease that has caused lack of movement. You’ll support people and work with them to improve their mobility. You may be involved in:

  • talking to people about their treatment
  • preparing for therapy
  • demonstrating equipment use
  • working through exercises
  • providing reports for the Physiotherapist,

For more information on the day-to-day duties of a Physiotherapy Assistant see the National Careers Service website.

Average salary:

£15,000 to £22,000 per year (National Careers Service)

Hours

Full time (37.5 to 40 hours per week) and part time hours are available. You may be asked to work shifts or have a rota.

Entry requirements

Some experience in a caring role is useful but is not essential. There are no set entry requirements but some organisations may request:

  • 4 or 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C)
  • Previous voluntary or paid experience of working with the people relevant to your roles eg. Older people, children or people with physical disabilities.

A first aid certificate or college course in health and social care can also be beneficial.

Training and qualifications

There are opportunities as a Physiotherapist Assistant to gain qualifications and undertake training programmes including NVQs.

Career progression

Opportunities for career progression include:

  • Senior Physiotherapy Support Worker or Assistant Practitioner. Experience as a Physiotherapy Assistant and further qualifications can lead to this role. The Chartered Society of Physiotherapy has information on opportunities to become an Assistant Practitioner.

  • Physiotherapist. Experience as a Physiotherapy Assistant can be valuable when applying for a degree in Physiotherapy as it shows experience and commitment. Find out about how to become a Physiotherapist on the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy website.

  • Other direct care roles. Experience as a Physiotherapy Assistant develops many skills that can be transferred to direct care roles in any Adult Social Care or Health setting.

This information  has been adapted from the National Careers Service website, for more information, you can visit their page on Physiotherapy Assistants here. Information has also been used from the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.

Occupational Therapy Support Worker

The role

Occupational Therapy Assistants work with Occupational Therapists to enable people's independence as they age or have a change in health or social circumstances. The role often involves providing encouragement and support to help people reach their rehabilitation goals set by the Occupational Therapist.

Occupational Therapy is often abbreviated to OT and an Occupation Therapy Support Worker may also be referred to as:

  • Occupational Therapy assistant
  • Occupational Therapy technician
  • Rehabilitation assistant
  • Technical instructor.

Average salary

£15,250 to £22,500 per year (National Careers Service)

Entry requirements

Some experience in a caring role is useful for an Occupational Therapy Support Worker but is not essential. There are no set entry requirements but some organisations may request:

  • 4 or 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C)
  • Previous voluntary or paid experience of working with the people relevant to your roles eg. Older people, children or people with physical disabilities.

Training and qualifications

There are opportunities as an Occupational Therapy Support Worker to gain qualifications and undertake training programmes including NVQs.

Career progression

Opportunities for career progression include:

  • Occupational Therapist. Experience as an Occupational Therapy Support Worker can be valuable when applying for a degree in Occupational Therapy as it shows experience and commitment. Find out about how to become a Occupational Therapist on the Royal College of Occupational Therapists website by clicking here.

  • Other direct care roles. Experience as an Occupational Therapy Support Worker develops many skills that can be transferred to direct care roles in any Adult Social Care or Health setting.

 The information for this page has been adapted from the National Careers Service website, for more information on Occupational Therapy Support Workers visit their website here

Activity Support Worker

The role

Activities Support Workers organise social, recreational or educational activities. An Activity Support Worker also supports and enables people to take part in activities including encouragement and clear instructions. Activities are important are an important opportunity to build skills. This role is often based in Care Homes or Day Centres but can also exist in the community.

Also may be known as:

  • Activities Worker
  • Activities Co-Ordinator

Hours

Full time (37.5 to 40 hours per week) and part time hours are available in this role.

Entry requirements

There are no set entry requirements for an Activity Support Worker but some organisations may request:

  • 4 or 5 GCSEs at grades 9 to 4 (A* to C)
  • Previous voluntary or paid experience.

Skills that are useful for this role include communication, organisation, research and time management.

Training and qualification

There are opportunities as an Activity Support Worker to gain qualifications and undertake training programmes such as a Diploma in Health and Social Care or certificate in activity provision. Some training will be mandatory such as moving and handling and other key topics.

Career Progression

Options include:

  • Senior Activity Worker: A Senior Activity Worker will have additional managerial responsibilities, this can include both staff and support planning. Previous work as an Activity Support Worker is useful experience and speaking to your line manager about management training opportunities will help you equip yourself to be a Senior Activity Worker.
  • Other direct care roles. Experience as a Physiotherapy Assistant develops many skills that can be transferred to direct care roles in any Adult Social Care or Health setting.

This information has been adapted from the Skills for Care website where you can find more useful information on Activity Support workers.

Personal Assistant

The Role

Personal assistants are employed directly by the person they are supporting. This support can be within their own home such as cleaning or cooking or enabling the person to get out in the community such as attending appointments, work or social activities.

it is a particularly flexible role as the Personal Assistant can decide how many individuals they want to support based on their personal circumstances.

Entry requirements

Relevant experience in Adult Social Care, previous work with vulnerable adults or a relevant qualification in Adult Social Care such as a Level 2 or 3 Diploma in Health and Social Care may be requested by some employers. However, many do not ask for these, often, your values, attitudes and behaviour are the most important to the employer as it is them you will be supporting.

Training and qualifications

Personal Assistants will normally have an induction from their employer when they begin working. This generally includes the training you will need such as first aid and more advanced training if the employer has specific additional care needs.

If you would like to complete additional training whilst in your role, your employer may pay for this or you can apply for an Advanced Learner Loan from the Government to support your self-funding.

Career progression

Personal Assistants have many opportunities to develop their careers. Some Personal Assistants become Senior Personal Assistants whilst others use this very relevant experience to move into another Direct Care role.

This information has been adapted from the Skills for Care website where you can find more useful information about Personal Assistants.

 

Shared Lives Carer

The Role

Shared Lives Carers provide care and support to people in the carer's own home, providing a community-based approach to supporting people to live their lives as independently as possible.

 The Herefordshire Shared Lives Scheme is managed by Herefordshire Council who recruit, assess and train Shared Lives Carers who live throughout Herefordshire; the carers then provide care and support to people in the carer's own home.

Shared Lives Carers offer long term and respite/short breaks with Shared Lives arrangements, working with adults of any age who wish to live or stay within a supported family-based Shared Lives setting.

Learn more

We have a whole page dedicated to Herefordshire's Shared Lives Carers, it includes FAQs and videos of some of our Shared Lives Carers talking about their role - let them tell you what it's really about! Click here to learn more.